Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) and Me

A brief history

After getting a degree in English Literature and writing in 1968, I joined the exploding information revolution, training as programmer analyst.

My IT career spanned computer and OS evolution from early third-generation mainframes through virtual machines—from flat indexed files through hierarchical and relational database—through numerous generations of Moore’s law chip evolution in minicomputers, microcomputers, tablets, and smart phones—from LAN through WAN and VPN—from Arpanet to the Internet and web-based applications. I designed, led, and managed development of online data based information systems for organizations as diverse as Harvard University, AT&T, the Federal Reserve Bank, and Merrill Lynch. I also did groundbreaking work at those institutions in methodology, CASE, and software process.

At Merrill Lynch (ML) in the decades on either side of the millennium, my career intersected with the Software Engineering Institute’s Capability Maturity Model for Software. CMM-based software process improvement became my full-time job for the remainder of my corporate IT career. I had formal SEI training as an Assessment Team member and participated in a number of weeks-long projects and gap analyses to assess organizational process maturity in numerous ML/IT departments. I became an SEI-certified CMM Trainer and presented numerous overviews and formal classes. At my corporate home base, the Jacksonville Solution Center, I was a leader in that department’s rapid evolution to CMM Level 5, the model’s highest organizational maturity rating. We had quantitative project, process, and quality management, and a program for continuous process improvement in all process areas addressed by CMM-SW. Along the way, I also received formal training as a Six Sigma Black Belt, which enabled me to develop the quantitative analysis and management practices necessary for CMM levels 4 and 5.

The CMM was evolving, even as we worked to apply it. The base CMM had been applied to numerous disciplines, in models for systems engineering, software engineering, software acquisition, workforce practices, and integrated product and process development. A comprehensive model, aptly named CMM Integration (CMMI), was released and is now the de facto standard.

After my departure from ML, I “discovered” another discipline that benefits from CMM integration. I’ve had a second career in digital media production, operating a “boutique” studio. I quickly realized that CMM processes were applicable to studio work. Although there are obvious differences between system/software engineering and media production, there is some overlap in project planning and management, requirements development & management, product integration, verification, and validation. I have informally adapted specific practices to plan and manage media projects, to continuously improve my process for making, editing, and distributing digital media, and to manage an ever-growing archive of digital media and reusable project assets.

My IT career left me with two lasting legacies that are relatively independent of galloping information technology: a systems/process analysis skill set and understanding of CMMI—as a model—and its specific practices for software engineering. I can still analyze requirements and develop a structured model of an application (or business process) and I continue to experiment with, reflect upon, and write about the CMMI’s profound utility and application in a growing array of disciplines—including media production.

I plan to explore the model over a series of articles in this blog and maybe a book. I write to consolidate, enhance, and share my own experience and knowledge. I don’t presume to write for experienced CMMI “experts”. I write for IT executives, managers, analysts, designers, and engineers who may want or need to learn more about the subject and may enjoy “readily digestible” forays into discrete aspects of the model’s daunting complexity. I also write for managers and practitioners in other disciplines who may be curious to see what a capability maturity model might offer to their work.

If you are interested, I invite you to “follow” this blog and join me on this journey of exploration and discovery.

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